Near "Olive Town"

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One portion of the Jesus Trail loops around the Jewish village of Kfar Zeitim. It is a lovely stretch of rural landscape that is—unsurprisingly—filled with olive trees. Kfar is an old semitic term for “village”; zeitim is the masculine plural for “olive.” One would expect such a scene when passing through the vicinity of “olive town.”

Olive trees are gnarly and stubby. They are heavily pruned over the course of decades (and even centuries!) in order to maintain the canopy, eliminate dead wood, and maximize the production of fruit.

Their grey-green leaves shimmer in the wind and offer contrast to the yellow-green grassy carpet.

The hills of Lower Galilee rise in the distance.


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Our next experience in the land of the Bible is slated for March 12-23, 2019. We’ll be doing a study-tour with Master’s-level students in Johnson University’s residency program. Student trips are always fast-paced, high-energy, and full of great conversation.

For a complete list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here.

An archaeologist's rig (part 13)

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Of all the rides featured in this stunning series few have reached the pinnacle of the sublime.

That just changed.

Behold.

If this doesn’t sweeten your Valentine’s Day, you are truly a cold being.

I came across this engineering marvel on the island of Mykonos, Greece, many years ago. If the creator is still alive, I’m sure it is still running. At least parts of it are. In something.


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While touring in Israel-Palestine, we use a slightly larger vehicle. Our standard coach seats 50, has lots of glass, air-conditioning, wifi, and often is labeled Mercedes. Wheelmen like “Johnny Magic” pictured here (center) are key to our safety and success. I couldn’t do what I do without these dear friends.

For a complete list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

Study-Tour 2000 (Israel, Egypt, Turkey)

I came across this image yesterday afternoon. It brought back some fond memories. It was shot in early March almost twenty years ago. The place was Giza, Egypt.

The faces are those of students and staff from the Cincinnati Christian University. These brave souls signed on for one of our most ambitious study-tours ever. Three countries in 14 days! Wowzer. But we filled every seat on the bus.

See anyone you recognize?

If you were a part of this trip, I’d love to hear from you. Care to share any photographs of your experience for other Bible Land Explorers? I can post them here. What memories does this image bring back for you?

Do tell. And show.


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These two young fellers were among the leaders of the trip pictured above. Funny, they haven’t changed a bit!

A few years have passed since 2000 but we are still up to old tricks. In March of 2019 we’ll be headed back to Israel/Palestine. This time we’ll have a student group from Johnson University in tow.

For a complete list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

A river of life

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As a whole, the country of Spain is old, dusty, and crackled. Average rainfall across the peninsula measures about 25 inches annually, comparable to the state of Nebraska. Of course, proximity to the sea, elevation, and other factors fudge the numbers and create local variations of temperature and precipitation.

Water from the sky must be augmented with irrigation efforts in order to meet modern agricultural demands. For this reason, canal systems to transport/distribute this life-giving moisture are common. In the Meseta, Spain’s inner plateau, these systems crisscross the surface of this baked anvil.

While walking alone on the Camino de Santiago the trinkling sound of the water makes for pleasant company. I snapped this image near the village of Villavante. 

Buen caminó!


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Our next adventure in the land of the Bible is slated for March 12-23, 2019. We’ll be doing a study-tour with Master’s-level students in Johnson University’s residency program. I’m already excited. Student trips are always fast-paced, high-energy, and full of great conversation.

For a complete list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.


Tristram's starling

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Henry Baker Tristram was a pastor-ornithologist (interesting combination!) who traveled through the Heartland of the Biblical World in 1858, 1863, and 1872. His interests in the natural world prompted several books on the land including The Great Sahara (1860), The Land of Israel, a Journey of Travels in Palestine, Undertaken with Special Reference to its Physical Character (1865), and The Natural History of the Bible (1867).

Several birds are named after him including the starling (or grackle) pictured above. One variety of the gerbil also carries his name.

He was an early adopter of Darwinian evolution and attempted to reconcile ideas of evolution and creation. Later in life he rejected Darwin’s theories.

This fine image was captured at the site of Masada by Bible Lands Explorer Mark Kitts. For a previous post of a remarkable bird and its discoverer see here.


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Our next adventure in the land of the Bible is slated for March 12-23, 2019. We’ll be doing a study-tour with Master’s-level students in Johnson University’s residency program. I’m already excited. Student trips are always fast-paced, high-energy, and full of great conversation.

For a complete list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

Multiple choice quiz

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This picture represents

(a) the consensus view of the NFL.

(b) a bad cruise.

(c) the attempt by Jon Weatherly and Mark Ziese to snag some rubbish from the Sea of Galilee.


The correct answer is c (although a was an excellent guess).

Rubbish snagging is a task requiring Ninja-like skills and should only be performed by trained experts. Do not attempt anything like this at home.

And some of you thought that college administrators were just pretty faces.

Photograph by Bible Land Explorer Mark Kitts. He really should apologize.


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There’s no telling what we are going to get ourselves into in 2019. But if you want to join our exclusive group of Bible Land Explorers you’ll need to contact me at markziese@gmail.com.

To see a list of planned travel opportunities in 2019 and beyond, consult our schedule here.

Bows and rainbows

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A rainbow appears in the sky after a winter rain in Lower Galilee.

It arcs toward the broken remnants of volcanic activity on the right side of the image. These elevated heights are known as the Horns of Hattin and are famous as the battle site that brought the 1st Crusade to an end in AD 1187. The war-bows of Salah-ed-Din won that day.

The war-bow (Hebrew qeshet) is mentioned on numerous occasions in the Bible. Curiously, it appears in the story of Noah (Gen 9:13-16). There, it is offered as a promise (or covenant), but don’t overlook the ancient imagery. After the flood, God hangs his weapon—the war-bow—on the wall, saying, in essence, “I won’t use that one again.”

For more on bows and rainbows, check out our observations from the slopes of Mt Ararat. You can find it here.

I shot this image while soloing the Jesus Trail a few weeks ago.


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Our next adventure in the land of the Bible is slated for March 12-23, 2019. We’ll be doing a study-tour with Master’s-level students in Johnson University’s residency program. I’m already excited. Student trips are always fast-paced, high-energy, and full of great conversation.

For a complete list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

Through the wood

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Approaching Sepphoris through the wood.

East-West ridges are dominant trends in Lower Galilee. These ridges are formed of soft chalky rocks, that at one point in time, were swathed in trees and topsoil. Today, much of that topsoil has been relocated in valley floors and apart from reforestation efforts (as shown), the trees are gone.

Environmental scientists tell us that the area of central Lower Galilee (as pictured here in the shaded trail between Nazareth and Sepphoris) is home to maquis forest.* Maquis is a technical term used to describe a distinctly Mediterranean biome where summers a long and dry and winters are short and wet. Indigenous trees include the carob, mastic, and a variety of evergreens, with oaks at elevation.

Photo by Bible Land Explorer Susan Ruth.


*See for example, Zvi Gal’s work on Lower Galilee during the Iron Age (ASOR, 1992).


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You are not going to find many bananas between Sepphoris and Nazareth (gotta go down into the Jordan Valley for that kind of heat), but you might find an occasional Jesus Trail hiker.

For a complete list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

Coming off the horns

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The descent between the Horns of Hattin and Nabi Shu'ayb has some short, steep, but manageable drops. I suppose some might try it in flip-flops but with lots of boulders, slippery mud, and a pack on your back, I would encourage a more stable trail shoe.

Apart from wind and mud, our January trek experienced good conditions everyday.

Note the (1) bovine welcoming committee below, and (2) the limestone quarry biting into the hills of Galilee (near Turan) on the distant horizon.

I’ve offered tidbits about the history and our experience of the Horns of Hattin elsewhere. See here and here for example.

I believe this photo came from the camera of Bible Land Explorer Gale Cochell (please correct me if I’m wrong!).


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. The Trail crosses the traverses the Horns of Hattin as it approaches the Sea of Galilee.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.


Winter sunset in Galilee

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It is tough to complain about winter temperatures in the Heartland when much of the US is being blasted by arctic air today.

Winters in Galilee are wet and cool (40s and 50s F). It can drop below freezing and snow does fall, but it doesn’t stick around very long.

I’ve hiked the Jesus Trail four times in January. Twice we experienced clear skies. Twice we were washed regularly by cold rain. We always got muddy. Winter hikes are an iffy proposition. Come prepared if this is your choice.

Of course, you can try it mid-summer. I’ve hiked it a couple of times in July and got baked. Go figure.

I shot this image of a January sunset from the window of my hotel room in Kibbutz Lavi.


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. The Trail crosses the Plain of Gennesaret as it approaches Capernaum.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.



Like a stag

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Thick vegetation crowds the path of the Jesus Trail as these Bible Land Explorers approach the Sea of Galilee. There is topsoil and water in abundance on the Plain of Gennesaret. Three streams, the Amud, Tzalmon, and the Arbel run through the plain and bequeath it with gifts. Areas dedicated to agriculture today produce bananas and mangos.

In the time of Christ, Josephus suggests a different set of crops were found here. Walnuts, dates, figs and olives occupy his list. His description (War 3.515-518) is one of exuberant fertility. Rabbinic texts echo his lead. Ber. Rab. 99.12 says of the Genesseret, let “her fruit ripen as swiftly as a stag” (cf. Gen. 49:21).*

Jesus was familiar with this area and passed through it repeatedly. See Mark 6:53, Matt 14:34, and Luke 5:1-3.


*See Zangenberg’s article on the Gennesaret in Jesus, Paul, and Early Christianity (2008: 454).


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. The Trail crosses the Plain of Gennesaret as it approaches Capernaum.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

Oop-oop-oop!

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The reeds along the edge of the Sea of Galilee provide the perfect habitat for many creatures including the hoopoe. While the rest of us were eating lunch, Susan, our birder, was hunting at water’s edge with her camera. She came back with a triumphant woop of her own; the hoopoe was on her Jesus Trail bucket list.

It was a beautiful specimen from the Upupidae family: cinnamon-colored, striped wings, with gorgeous crest. The name, hoopoe, may derived from its cry: “oop-oop-oop!”

The hoopoe may appear twice in the Hebrew Bible as the dukiypat (Lev 11:19 and Deut 14:18). Both texts lump it together with the bat or the heron as unclean creatures (sheketz). The reason for this is unknown, although it may be related to the fact that the ancient Egyptians considered the hoopoe to have magical and medicinal powers.*


*See article by Timothy Schum, “From Egypt to Mount Qaf: The Symbolism of the Hoopoe in Muslim Literature and Folklore.” Pp. 37-57 in Journal of Islamic and Muslim Studies 3/1 (May 2018).


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. We were lunching along the trail behind Kerei Deshe on the Sea of Galilee when Susan spotted the hoopoe.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

What catches your eye?

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Among our troop of Jesus Trail hikers this month we had a professional birder. For real! While some of us were understandably fixated on the magnificent stonework of ancient Caesarea, Susan spotted a Hooded Crow gliding by.

Isn’t it amazing how multiple perspectives enrich our travel?

Observe. Engage. Contemplate.

It’s more than a slogan.


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. In addition to exploring sites along the Trail, we visited Caesarea, Mt Carmel, Megiddo, and Jerusalem.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

Required reading for explorers (part 1)

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East Africa is not among the Lands of the Bible, but I can’t help but wave this paperback under your nose. National Geographic considers Felice Benuzzi’s No Picnic on Mount Kenya (1953) among the best 100 adventure stories ever written. It is certainly the most entertaining book I’ve read in a long time. It unexpectedly combines two story lines: a daring escape by three men from a WWII prison camp and their attempt to climb a 5,000-meter mountain.

The twists are many. Beyond the self-effacing humor embedded in author’s suffering and the creativity required to manufacture their own alpine gear, there is the purpose outlined from the beginning of the book: should they be successful in breaking out of the camp and making it up and down the mountain alive, they must then break back into the camp. It is a matter of honor. On the way out they left a note for the captors promising to return.

I am no spoiler: the hero at the end of this well-told story is the indomitable human spirit.

Benuzzi, far right, with friends from the prison camp. Image from    here.

Benuzzi, far right, with friends from the prison camp. Image from here.


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In addition to our usual trips to the lands of the bible (see our 2019 schedule here), I think there might be a few more mountains in our future. The invitation is always open for you to join us—either on the heights or in the depths.

Contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

Gazing across Lower Galilee

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I stand on the edge of the ancient site associated with the prophet Jonah. Today the hill holds an Arab village by the name of Mashhad.

In the distance, beyond the immediate lines of trees, a dark hill rises with a square structure near the summit (look toward the upper left side of the image, about one-third of the way in from the margin). That dark hill and the slope that runs toward us is the site of Sepphoris. During the time when Jesus was growing up in nearby Nazareth, Sepphoris was being rebuilt as the urban center of all Galilee.

Sepphoris and Mashhad are both sites along the Jesus Trail.


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. In addition to exploring Sepphoris, we visited Nazareth, Capernaum, Magdala, and Tiberias.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.


Upgrades

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If it has been more than five years since you have visited the Roman Catholic portion of the site of Capernaum, you will be surprised to see it today. The entry area, the plaza, the waterfront have all undergone significant renovation. The primary structures on display—the “White” synagogue and the House of Peter—appear as before, but other upgrades are striking. The entry area, the plaza, the waterfront provide improved accessibility, seating, garden, and devotional areas.

The site has an occupation history stretching from the 2nd century BC to the 13th century AD.

The name of the site originates in the Aramaic, Kefar Nahum, or “Village of Nahum” (but not that Nahum!).

It was a significant center in the Galilean ministry of Jesus. As the Gospel of Mark records (2:1), when he “entered Capernaum, the people heard that he had come home.”


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. In addition to exploring Capernaum, we visited Nazareth, Sepphoris, Magdala, and Tiberias.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

The prettiest ugly fish I’ve ever seen

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You never know what kind of surprise awaits you at the kosher tables of the Royal Plaza, Tiberias. This is the prettiest ugly fish I’ve ever seen. Frankenfish! I don’t know where he came from, but it wasn’t the Sea of Galilee.

The good news is when you walk the Jesus Trail with me in the wintertime, we’re not eating freeze dried food from a foil envelope. Nooope. The question at my table is whether the napkins will be paper or cloth.


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. In addition to an overnight in Tiberias, we bivouacked in Netanya, Kibbutz Lavi, and Jerusalem.

For a full list of travel opportunities in the Lands of the Bible, 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for details.

An omnistic bobcat

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Restoration work at the site of Maritime Caesarea, Israel, is ongoing. Fresh aspects of the site are visible with every visit.

There is a newly opened path along the eastern ramparts inside the Crusader fortress and an extension to the pavilion north of the fortress.

If you haven’t been to Caesarea lately, it is time to come back.

I thought you might enjoy a shot to this omnistic bobcat resting from his labor in the harbor area.

Oh, and don’t miss the rainbow in the winter sky!


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. In addition to exploring Caesarea, we visited Mediggo, Bethlehem, and Jerusalem.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.

Doused by sun and rain

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The city of Sepphoris was splendidly restored by Herod Antipas. According to Josephus, Herod “built a wall about Sepphoris, (which is the security of all Galilee) and made it the metropolis of the country” (Ant 18.27). Antipas renamed it Autocratoris, a term that may suggest the title of the emperor or the fact that the city was somehow politically autonomous.

As I hiked by the site I was alternatively doused by sun and rain. Galilee in January can be that way.

In this shot, the acropolis of Sepphoris rises on the left. The summit is marked by a Crusader-era stronghold. Buildings of the modern kibbutz spread in the foreground. Upper Galilee looms in the distance, wet and purple.


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Our most recent group of Bible Land Explorers just completed a walk along the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. In addition to exploring Sepphoris, we visited Nazareth, Magdala, and Tiberias.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.


Men's side

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The edge of the platform that Herod built, Jerusalem.


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Our current group of Bible Land Explorers are walking the Jesus Trail, a 65 km trek across Galilee. In addition to hiking through muddy orchards, we are laughing, talking, and experiencing sites associated with the Gospel story.

For a list of travel opportunities in 2019, see our schedule here. You may also contact me at markziese@gmail.com for more details.